">
Research articles predict next earthquake

Friday, November 11, 2005

Two research articles published this week illustrate continuing efforts to predict earthquakes. The first article builds upon the idea that analysis of the first seismic waves from an earthquake can provide a way to generate a several second warning that an earthquake will hit. However, for such warnings to be useful, the early seismic waves should also allow prediction of the strength of the earthquake. An article published in this week’s edition of Nature concludes that scientists might be able to distinguish small earthquakes from big ones by using the very first second of information contained in seismic waves.

Researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, say the measurements of seismic waves soon after a trembler can signal whether it will be a minor or monster trembler. “Basically, a high-pitched squeal means that you’ll get a smaller quake. A low-groan means something bigger,” says the University of California’s Richard Allen.

In the study, Allen and colleagues analyzed records of 71 major Pacific Rim quakes in the past decades including 24 events that were greater than a magnitude 6. Using a mathematical model, they were able to estimate a quake’s size to within one magnitude unit from as little as four seconds of data of the frequency of the energy in the primary wave. These low-energy waves typically cause a jolt, signaling the occurrence of a quake.

According to a traditional theory, called the cascade model, we cannot know anything about an earthquake’s ultimate magnitude until it is finished. This is because spread along a fault line depends on the stress in each individual part of the fault. Given that this information is not available to the initial rupture point, it should be impossible to tell from that first slip how far it will go or how long it will last.

The study by Berkeley’s Allen and Erik L. Olson of the University of Wisconsin-Madison builds upon earlier work by Yutaka Nakamura in Japan. Nakamura’s research indicated that the frequency of the P wave can allow prediction of which earthquakes will have a magnitude greater than 6 and distinguish them from small tremors that do not require warnings. Some fire stations use P wave detectors to automatically open doors in an effort to make sure that emergency vehicles are not trapped inside by doors that can be jammed shut by earthquake damage.

The goal of this research is to make the best possible use of the information from the earliest seismic waves emitted by an earthquake as part of an alert system to give seconds to tens of seconds of advance notice of an impending quake — enough time for schoolchildren to take cover, power generators to trip off and valves to shut on pipelines. A major limitation of this work is that the greatest earthquake damage is near the epicenter where there is little time difference between the early P waves and the strongest damaging earthquake waves.

The second research paper, published this week in the scientific magazine Physical Review Letters, builds upon earlier research into patterns of earthquake activity at specific faults. The new research by scientists from Israel and Germany led by Prof. Shlomo Havlin, of Bar-Ilan University’s Department of Physics in Israel, concerns prediction of the timing between earthquakes.

Prof. Havlin’s research, in collaboration with Prof. Armin Bunde, of the Justus-Liebig University in Giessen, Germany, and Bar-Ilan University graduate student Valerie Livina, involved a large number of past earthquakes at many different faults. The data used in this study were for earthquakes ranging from magnitude 2 to magnitude 5.5 on the Richter Scale. Data were from several areas of the world including California, Japan, and New Zealand. The new results are consistent with previous studies which have indicated that some faults have more frequent small earthquakes while other faults have less frequent and larger earthquakes.



">
State of emergency declared in New York over H1N1 swine flu virus

Thursday, October 29, 2009

According to US health officials, New York state governor David Paterson has declared a state of emergency in the state as a result of the H1N1 swine flu outbreak.

The Associated Press news agency reports that the six-page declaration was issued because at least 75 people have died of H1N1 related illnesses in New York since April. Three have died from H1N1 related illnesses just this past week. The declaration also says that human cases of the virus are on the rise.

Paterson says he issued the declaration because “a disaster has occurred throughout New York State, for which the affected local governments are unable to respond adequately.”

The declaration will allow health officials more access to the H1N1 vaccine and the seasonal flu shot. It will also allow for an increase in the number of vaccine doses available in the state and will allow more health care facilities to administer the vaccine, including dentists and pharmacists. Schools with health centers will also be allowed to administer both vaccines.

Despite the declaration, officials stressed that there is no reason to worry. A spokeswoman for the New York State Department of Health, Claire Pospisil, said that “it [the declaration] helps us to be more prepared.”

The order came shortly after US president Barack Obama declared a national emergency last Saturday, a response to the spreading of the virus, which has now been circulated in 46 states.



How To Save Big On Auto Insurance Costs

Submitted by: David Maillie

With a stagnant economy, prices on everything rising, the constant threat of high gas prices, and recent sales and state tax hikes on our automobiles has made it important to find ways to save anywhere we can. A big and easy area to save lots of money is auto insurance. It is amazing that regardless of the commercials like Geico and Progressive telling people to shop for the best rate that 90 percent or more never do. You need to make sure you are getting the best deal possible. You work too hard to through easy money away and make insurance representatives and executives rich. Recent research shows that you can save hundreds or even thousands of dollars just by making a few phone calls and shopping around a little bit.

According to the Insurance Research Council the average savings by shopping around auto insurance carriers is $847. That s $847 per year and that is a lot of money to throw away. To start saving first call your auto insurance company and ask if you are getting all the discounts you qualify for. Most will happily oblige you on this as they want to keep their customers happy. Discounts could be for things like no accidents, age, sex, driving history, college student, even good grades (I believe just Allstate has this one right now). Discounts of 2 percent to 5 percent may not seem like much but could easily become several hundred dollars or more per year really fast. The biggest deduction is usually a clean, accident free driving record and that can be from 4 to 20 percent or more per year in savings. Just be careful as it only takes 1 infraction to nullify most or all of these discounts.

YouTube Preview Image

Check and see if you have any points on your license. If you do not remember if you have had a recent (last 4 years in most cases except DUI), just call your auto insurance agency. They can tell you exactly how many points, why or what the infraction was and what you can do to fix or reduce them. Many auto insurance agencies or companies sponsor safe driving classes if yours does not a simple call or visit to your local DMV will reveal many classes that can remove or lower points and reduce insurance costs or award deductions. Many of these classes are only a one day affair for 4 to 5 hours. Some are free and some may cost $20 to around $50. Regardless, in what they will save you in one year alone it is well worth it.

And the big one, shop around. You need to do this every few years even if your current auto insurer is the best, they may not be in two years. Rates are constantly changing along with crash test and theft recovery numbers. It also depends on where you live. If you have recently moved or are planning a move then shop your auto insurance. The same auto insurance company may have totally different rates (and probably does) in different cities. Even if you have had some recent infractions or just received one, shop your rate. You need to do this as you will save big money. The average savings for all insured persons that shop their rate is $847. The average for those that don t is obviously a big fat zero. Definitely include Progressive and Geico in your shopping as they will usually have the lowest rates and best service. I have personally found Progressive to have the lowest rates in New York and North Carolina.

It is also a good idea to drive safely and to continue to drive safely (non aggressively). It will not only save you big on insurance, but it could save your life or the life of someone else. And never pass a stopped school bus. There is a reason why its 4 points or more on your license, respect school buses and kids for they may not always see you and if something bad were to happen you would never forget or forgive yourself.

About the Author: For more great information, tips, safety and money saving products please visit:

mdwholesale.com

.

Source:

isnare.com

Permanent Link:

isnare.com/?aid=89889&ca=Automotive



">
Main Page/topical
Welcome to Wikinews,
the free-content news source you can write!

December 27, 2017 19:02 UTC | Latest articles RSS | Audio RSS| Print RSS


Refresh to see the latest news! If you find a problem with an article, fix it or comment on the article’s discussion page. RSS What is RSS?

  • 26 December 2017: Russia: Runaway bus kills at least four in entrance to Moscow Metro station
  • 25 December 2017: Guatemalan president Jimmy Morales announces move of Israeli embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem
  • 24 December 2017: England: Fire at London Zoo kills aardvark, meerkats believed dead
  • 15 December 2017: England: Baby born with heart outside body operated on; surviving, three weeks after birth
  • 13 December 2017: Apple, Inc. confirms acquisition of Shazam
  • 12 December 2017: UEFA Champions League 2017–2018: Draw for Last 16 held at Nyon
  • 11 December 2017: Football: Peter Stöger replaces Peter Bosz as Borussia Dortmund’s boss
  • 8 December 2017: Wikinews attends ComicCon in Bangalore, India
  • 6 December 2017: Yemen: Former president Ali Abdullah Saleh killed in Sana’a by Houthi militants
  • 30 November 2017: Football: Italian club AC Milan sacks Vincenzo Montella as manager

What’s this? We are currently testing a different format for the latest news section which includes the newest stories from each category. You can also see the Old style. Please do not hesitate to voice your opinion about this layout.

Crime and law Culture and entertainment Disasters and accidents Economy and business
  • Israeli Health minister Ya’akov Litzman resigns in protest after Jews made to work on Jewish rest day
  • Italian court sentences Brazilian footballer Robinho to nine years for 2013 sexual assault
  • Charles Manson, serving nine life sentences for 1969 murders, dies aged 83
  • Apple, Inc. confirms acquisition of Shazam
  • Wikinews attends ComicCon in Bangalore, India
  • Kazakhstan: President Nazarbayev signs decree to change Kazakh characters from Cyrillic to Latin-based script
  • Russia: Runaway bus kills at least four in entrance to Moscow Metro station
  • England: Fire at London Zoo kills aardvark, meerkats believed dead
  • DR Congo: Train crash kills more than 30 in Lualaba province
  • Apple, Inc. confirms acquisition of Shazam
  • CMHC: housing market in Canada ‘highly vulnerable’
  • Uber London to lose operator licence after September
Education Environment Health Obituaries
  • Arrangement of light receptors in the eye may cause dyslexia, scientists say
  • Detroit teachers stage sickout to protest working conditions as Obama visits
  • Time magazine names Ahmed Mohamed to ‘Most Influential Teens of 2015’
  • U.S. government report says climate change is human-made
  • Researchers find preserving spotted owl habitat may not require a tradeoff with wildfire risk after all
  • India Supreme Court overrules High Court: rivers Yamuna, Ganga no longer living entities
  • England: Baby born with heart outside body operated on; surviving, three weeks after birth
  • Arrangement of light receptors in the eye may cause dyslexia, scientists say
  • Publisher withdraws book about Nelson Mandela’s final days after family complaint
  • Charles Manson, serving nine life sentences for 1969 murders, dies aged 83
  • US rock artist Tom Petty dies at 66
  • British actor Tony Booth dies at 85
Politics and conflicts Science and technology Sports Wackynews
  • Guatemalan president Jimmy Morales announces move of Israeli embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem
  • Yemen: Former president Ali Abdullah Saleh killed in Sana’a by Houthi militants
  • Israeli Health minister Ya’akov Litzman resigns in protest after Jews made to work on Jewish rest day
  • Minnesota attorney general announces plans to join other U.S. states in Net Neutrality lawsuit
  • Researchers report rapid formation of new bird species in Galápagos islands
  • Singapore announces driverless buses on public roads from 2022
  • UEFA Champions League 2017–2018: Draw for Last 16 held at Nyon
  • Football: Peter Stöger replaces Peter Bosz as Borussia Dortmund’s boss
  • Football: Italian club AC Milan sacks Vincenzo Montella as manager
  • Wikinews interviews producer of horror film ‘6:66PM’
  • India Supreme Court overrules High Court: rivers Yamuna, Ganga no longer living entities
  • Google blocks home device from responding to Burger King commercial
Africa Asia Oceania Central America
  • Zimbabwe: Robert Mugabe resigns presidency after military coup, threat of impeachment
  • DR Congo: Train crash kills more than 30 in Lualaba province
  • Man with knife stabs people in Finnish city of Turku
  • China’s growing problem with Tibetan monks self-immolating
  • Singapore announces driverless buses on public roads from 2022
  • GM posts first annual loss since 1992
  • Australia bars North Korea’s U-19 football team from entering country citing ‘illegal nuclear programmes’
  • New South Wales police extradict ‘self-healer’ Hongchi Xiao from London over death of six-year-old boy at conference
  • Australia: Victorian government to trial driverless vehicles on public roads
  • Fifteen states sue United States President Donald Trump for cancelling program for undocumented immigrant minors
  • Gunmen murder Honduran indigenous leader Berta Cáceres
  • Guatemalan Supreme Court approves impeachment of President Molina
Europe Middle East North America South America
  • England: Fire at London Zoo kills aardvark, meerkats believed dead
  • Apple, Inc. confirms acquisition of Shazam
  • Football: Italian club AC Milan sacks Vincenzo Montella as manager
  • Guatemalan president Jimmy Morales announces move of Israeli embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem
  • Yemen: Former president Ali Abdullah Saleh killed in Sana’a by Houthi militants
  • Israeli Health minister Ya’akov Litzman resigns in protest after Jews made to work on Jewish rest day
  • Apple, Inc. confirms acquisition of Shazam
  • Charles Manson, serving nine life sentences for 1969 murders, dies aged 83
  • Gunman kills at least four in shooting in Rancho Tehama, California
  • Italian court sentences Brazilian footballer Robinho to nine years for 2013 sexual assault
  • Researchers report rapid formation of new bird species in Galápagos islands
  • Hurricane Nate weakens as it reaches United States


Full list of topics

Add/remove days


+1-866-653-4265 (toll-free in the U.S. only)+1-202-742-5918 (outside the U.S. – long distance)

Africa | Asia | Central America | Europe | Middle East | North America | Oceania | South America

All regions, countries and topics


Start a new article

Articles are written by readers like you!To report on a news event, check if it is already being covered. If not, write a quick brief. For more guidance, see Wikinews:Writing an article. Got news, but no time to write a full article or a quick brief? Tell us what news you would like to see covered by Wikinews at Wikinews:Requested articles.

International row after Spielberg quits 2008 Beijing Olympics

The U.S. film director stepped down as artistic adviser saying that China, which has close links to the Sudanese government, should do more to address the Darfur situation. » Full story


Featured Story

‘Top Model’ winner Jaslene Gonzalez on her career and being a Latina role model

Wikinews talks with America’s Next Top Model’s first Puerto Rican winner, Jaslene Gonzalez, about her childhood, what makes her a strong individual, and what television show her abuela would want her to go on. This is also the first time one of our interviews can also be read in Spanish at Wikinoticias. » Full story


The Print Edition has been temporarily discontinued. Please visit the Print Edition archives for previous editions.

Audio Wikinews

August 06, 2010


Wikinews from December 27, 2008 (More…)

  • Israeli air strikes hit government compounds in Gaza

Wikinews from December 27, 2007 (More…)

  • Tiger that escaped enclosure at San Francisco Zoo may have ‘climbed’ over wall
  • Feared toll of Indonesian floods, landslides up to 130; dozens missing as bridge swept away
  • US Presidential candidates offer condolences to family of Benazir Bhutto
  • Benazir Bhutto killed in suicide attack

Wikinews from December 27, 2006 (More…)

  • Polar bears reviewed to become “threatened” species
  • Canadian gold-medalist arrested, charged with kidnapping
  • Former U.S. President Gerald Ford dies, aged 93
  • 68 pieces of luggage found behind Texas pet store

Wikinews from December 27, 2005 (More…)

  • Greek newspaper reports British spy involved in torturing 28 Pakistani citizens
  • Timekeeping will pause into the New Year with a ‘Leap Second’
  • Fire destroys a Social Security building in Brasilia
  • New Zealand Christmas road toll is at ten

Wikinews from December 27, 2004 (More…)

  • Indian Ocean Earthquake
  • Yushchenko claims victory in re-run
  • U.S. and U.K. governments warn citizens against travelling to areas hit by tsunamis
  • Drug-dealers war in Rio de Janeiro

  • Israel transport minister Katz plans to name a railway station after US president Donald Trump
  • What Really Happened with the Hamilton High School Football Program
  • Four Life-saving Tips About Video ML
  • China’s growing problem with Tibetan monks self-immolating
  • The Truth on Truther Richard Gage
  • Minnesota attorney general announces plans to join other U.S. states in Net Neutrality lawsuit
  • Philippines: Mindanao hit by tropical storm Tembin, death toll rises to over 200
  • Israeli chess players barred at Chess tournament in Saudi Arabia

  • UN General Assembly Vote on Status of Jerusalem
  • Pankaj Tripathi gets emotional while watching short film Mum
  • Synagogues in four cities receive anti-Semitic hate mail
  • Jill Stein Involved in Russia Investigation
  • United States: Amtrak train derails near Olympia, Washington
  • Jammu Metro
  • African Lives Matter stages protests in Westminster London
  • Disney buys 21st Century Fox for US$52.4 billion
  • The working visit of Professor and Master in Krav Maga Itay Gil at the Spartans Academy in Sheffield
  • YourQuote an integrated content platform raises $ 1 m seed funding
  • North Korea launches intercontinental ballistic missile, claims its range includes all of the continental US
  • Older Adults’ Forgetfulness Tied To Faulty Brain Rhythms In Sleep
  • Wikipedia co-founder joins Everipedia
  • Rake Software has been hacked
  • Alpana bhartia
  • Protests in India against the release of the film Padmavati
  • Israel: failing to comply with transportation law, Tel Aviv court orders Uber to partially stop its taxi ordering services
  • Singapore: SMRT Corporation dismisses eight employees, disciplines five more, over maintenance record falsification in tunnel flooding incident
  • Heavy floodings in north-west England, north Wales and Ireland
  • Annual Oregon Coast Clean Up And Awareness Day
  • Luka Magnotta-Omar Laparra Connection
  • Fox News gets sued by Black Lives Matter protester
  • Scientific expedition to the homeland Cus D’Amato was completed with series of discoveries
  • US state of Alabama elects its first Democratic US Senator in 25 years
  • Indonesia: thousands gather in front of Jakarta’s US embassy to condemn recognition of Jerusalem as Israeli capital by the United States
  • Secretary Boris Johnson tries to free imprisoned mother in Iran
  • Violence keeps growing especially in Gaza Strip and West Bank after US president announced recognising Jerusalem as Israel’s capital
  • Suspicion of nuclear weapon test in Kerman, Iran
  • US Supreme Court approves newest version of President Donald Trump’s travel ban
  • Wiki Science Competition 2017 has started in the whole world
  • Former US security advisor Michael Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBI, agrees to cooperate with Mueller investigation
  • YouTube removes over 150,000 videos showing child abuse
  • AT&T makes new proposal to Time Warner deal
  • Two men who caused great panic at Oxford Circus tube station released

Original reportingFirst-hand journalism by Wikinews reporters (More…)

  • For fans, by fans: Toronto anime event 2017 among continent’s largest
  • Wikinews visits set of indie film ‘Dead on Set’
  • Fans unite at Toronto Comicon, meet Degrassi stars

A Wikimedia project

We are a group of volunteers whose mission is to present reliable, unbiased, relevant and entertaining news. All content is released under a free license. By making our content perpetually available for free redistribution and use, we hope to contribute to a global digital commons. Wikinews stories are written from a neutral point of view to ensure fair and unbiased reporting.

Wikinews needs you! We want to create a diverse community of citizens from around the globe who collaborate to report on a wide variety of current events. To contribute to Wikinews reporting, read an Introduction to Wikinews and visit the Newsroom.

If you find Wikinews or its sister projects useful, please consider making a donation. Donations are used primarily for purchasing computer equipment and launching new projects.



">
Democratic holdout agrees to support health care reform in US

Sunday, December 20, 2009

A conservative Democratic United States senator has agreed to supply the key 60th vote needed for passage of a sweeping health care reform package. Senate Democrats have reached a breakthrough in their struggle to pass sweeping heath care reform legislation, lining up the 60 votes needed to overcome fierce Republican opposition. Senators met Saturday in Washington, D.C. during a driving snowstorm in a frenzied effort to move forward on President Barack Obama’s top domestic priority.

The spotlight was on moderate Democratic Senator Ben Nelson of Nebraska, who had been the last holdout as Senate Democrats raced against the clock and against determined Republican opposition to pass their health care bill by their self-imposed deadline of December 25th, Christmas.

Change is never easy, but change is what is necessary in America today and and that is why I intend to vote for cloture, I intend to vote for cloture and for health care reform.

Nelson said he is now ready to vote for cloture, which would advance the bill. “Change is never easy, but change is what is necessary in America today and and that is why I intend to vote for cloture, I intend to vote for cloture and for health care reform,” he said.

Nelson said he decided to support the bill after winning new concessions from Democratic Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to limit the availability of abortions in insurance sold under the new legislation along with millions of dollars in Medicaid funding for Nebraska.

The legislation would extend health benefits to more than 30 million uninsured Americans and impose new regulations on the health insurance industry.

Senator Reid of Nevada has been working for months to win over one holdout Democratic senator after another, repeatedly altering the bill to satisfy different demands. Reid says reform is essential. “The broken system cannot continue and it will not continue. When President Obama signs this bill into law, we will officially end the era in which insurance companies win only when patients lose,” he said.

The broken system cannot continue and it will not continue. When President Obama signs this bill into law, we will officially end the era in which insurance companies win only when patients lose.

Nelson’s support should pave the way for Senate Democrats to win the first of a series of crucial procedural votes scheduled to begin at one o’clock in the morning on Monday and set to conclude — if everything goes smoothly for them — with final passage on Christmas Eve.

Republicans have been using a number of parliamentary procedures to delay action on the bill, including forcing a reading on the Senate floor Saturday of Reid’s 338-pages of last minute amendments. Republican Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky responded to the apparent Democratic breakthrough. “And Democrats are forcing a vote on it, as I indicated, over the weekend, counting on the fact that the American people are preoccupied with Christmas and not paying much attention to what they are doing,” he said.

The history that is being made here, make no mistake about it, the history that is being made here, is the ignoring of the will of the American people.

Republicans are unified in their opposition, saying the bill is too expensive and will not solve the problems with the current health care system. Senator McConnell dismissed claims by Democrats that the bill is historic. “The history that is being made here, make no mistake about it, the history that is being made here, is the ignoring of the will of the American people,” he said.

Senator John McCain of Arizona echoed those comments in the weekly Republican radio address saying, “Regrettably, there’s nothing in this legislation that effectively addresses the problem of health care hyperinflation. In fact, experts tell us the Democrat legislation makes matters worse.”

Democrats say they have been trying to reform the nation’s health care system for close to 70 years, ever since President Franklin Delano Roosevelt was in office. Senator Christopher Dodd of Connecticut was emotional as victory seemed within reach. “All we are trying to do is to guarantee that if you are a fellow citizen of ours, and you are struck with illness or a loved one is, that you will never again have that fear, that you will end up losing your home, your job, your retirement and your life savings because you have been afflicted with an illness through no fault of your own.”

If the Senate is able to pass a bill next week, it would be viewed as a major victory for President Obama. But the bill would still need to be reconciled with a health-care reform bill passed last month by the House of Representatives before the president could sign it into law next year.



">
Rapper ‘Snoop Dogg’ arrested at California airport

Friday, October 27, 2006

Rap artist Snoop Dogg was arrested for possession of an illegal drug and possession of a firearm, according to police on Thursday.

The rapper’s real name is Calvin Broadus. He was arrested at 3:45 p.m. on Thursday at Bob Hope Airport located in Burbank, California. Broadus paid the $35,000 bail and is expected back in Los Angeles County Superior Court on December 12, 2006.

Airport police officers stopped the artist for parking in the airport passenger loading and unloading zone. Upon conducting a search of the vehicle, the police found a gun and a quantity of marijuana inside.

Broadus’ attorney, Donald Etra, stated “There was no basis for this arrest. We believe that once this is cleared up, all charges will be dismissed”. Authorities in California have not yet pressed charges.

In September, Broadus attempted to carry a folding police baton onto an aircraft and was arrested at John Wayne Airport located in Orange County, California. Earlier this year, he was also cautioned for fighting in Heathrow Airport in London, England.



">
Empire Strikes Back director Irvin Kershner dies aged 87

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

Irvin Kershner, director of the second Star Wars movie The Empire Strikes Back, died Saturday at his home in Los Angeles, California aged 87; this followed a three-and-a-half year battle with lung cancer. The announcement of his death was made Monday, by his god-daughter, Adriana Santini.

He knew everything a Hollywood director is supposed to know. […] but was not Hollywood.

His previous credits, working as a photographer and musician, included A fine madness and Eyes of Laura Mars, the latter of these being the inspiration for the creator of the Star Wars movies, George Lucas, to offer him the director’s role for The Empire Strikes Back — something which he initially refused, only to be later persuaded because Lucas felt his attention to the development of characters was important. Lucas later admitted he hadn’t wanted to direct the sequel himself. Speaking of the director, Lucas said: “He knew everything a Hollywood director is supposed to know. […] but was not Hollywood.”

He also gained recognition after being nominated for an Emmy, for the 1976 TV Movie Raid on Entebbe, an award which he didn’t win, but which thrust him into the spotlight.

As a director, Kershner went on to be the driving force behind Sean Connery’s return to the role of James Bond, directing Never Say Never Again in 1983. Moving further into the realms of Science Fiction, Kershner directed Robocop 2 in 1990.

Kershner was not limited to behind the scenes work; he acted in two films, Martin Scorcese’s The Last Temptation of Christ, in which he played Zebedee; and, starred as a film director in Stephen Seagal’s On Deadly Ground.



">
Wikinews’ overview of the year 2008

Wednesday, December 31, 2008

Also try the 2008 World News Quiz of the year.

What would you tell your grandchildren about 2008 if they asked you about it in, let’s say, 20 years’ time? If the answer to a quiz question was 2008, what would the question be? The year that markets collapsed, or perhaps the year that Obama became US president? Or the year Heath Ledger died?

Let’s take a look at some of the important stories of 2008. Links to the original Wikinews articles are in all the titles.



">
Wikinews interviews former Salt Lake City mayor and 2012 presidential candidate Rocky Anderson

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Former Salt Lake City mayor and human rights activist Rocky Anderson took some time to discuss his 2012 U.S. presidential campaign and the newly-created Justice Party with Wikinews reporter William S. Saturn.

Anderson served as mayor of Salt Lake City for eight years (2000–2008) as a member of the Democratic Party. During his tenure, he enacted proposals to reduce the city’s carbon emissions, reformed its criminal justice system, and positioned it as a leading sanctuary for refugees. After leaving office, Anderson grew critical of the Democratic Party’s failure to push for impeachment against President George W. Bush, and for not reversing policies on torture, taxes, and defense spending. He left the party earlier this year and announced that he would form a Third party.

Anderson officially established the Justice Party last week during a press conference in Washington D.C.. He proclaimed “We the people are powerful enough to end the perverse government-to-the-highest-bidder system sustained by the two dominant parties…We are here today for the sake of justice — social justice, environmental justice and economic justice.” The party promotes campaign finance reform and is attempting to appeal to the Occupy Wall Street movement. It is currently working on ballot access efforts, and will hold a Founding Convention in February 2012 in Salt Lake City.

Among other issues, Anderson discussed climate change, health care, education, and civil liberties. He detailed his successes as mayor of Salt Lake City, stressed the importance of executive experience, and expressed his views on President Barack Obama and some of the Republican Party presidential candidates. He spoke in depth about former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney, with whom he worked during the 2002 Winter Olympics, and fellow Utahan, former governor and U.S. ambassador to China Jon Huntsman, Jr..

Contents

  • 1 Background
  • 2 The Justice Party and opposition
  • 3 The GOP race
  • 4 Public policy and the state of democracy
  • 5 Related articles
  • 6 Sources


">
Iran to launch its first nuclear power plant

Saturday, August 14, 2010

Ali Akbar Salehi, chief of Iran’s Atomic Energy Agency, announced Friday that Iran is scheduled to launch its first nuclear power plant in Bushehr. Russia said that it will start loading fuel into the reactor on August 21, 2010.

Russia has assisted Iran in the construction of this reactor since the mid-1990s. The proposal to build this reactor was put forth 35 years ago by Mohammad Rez? Sh?h Pahlavi, the former emperor of Iran.

Dmitry Anatolyevich Medvedev, the current president of Russia, said that Iran and Russia are in active trade partnership. Medvedev called on Iran last month to explain its nuclear program.

The official launch is scheduled for August 21, 2010. Russia has promised to run the plant by supplying fuel and taking away fuel waste.